Single frauen jena Hundkoppel online dating

Abstract: Although online dating has only recently become culturally acceptable and widespread, using computers to make romantic matches has a long history.

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The idea that women and men might meet casually, for sex, instead of within a social context that positioned marriage as the objective, hindered computer dating.In order to limit the “sleaze factor” associated with match-ups made by machines, early computer dating services focused on transferring the social mores that structured non-computerized dating and mating onto these new machine-aided systems.Because sexuality structures our technological interactions as much as it structures our social ones, sexuality intersects with the history of computing in important ways.Technology is itself an extension of society and social organization.It explores the mid-twentieth century origins of computer dating and matchmaking in order to argue for the importance of using sexuality as a lens of analysis in the history of computing.

Doing so makes more visible the heteronormativity that silently structures much of our technological infrastructure and helps bring other questions about gender, race, and class into the foreground.They cultivated predominantly white, straight, middle-class user bases in the hope that the perceived respectability of this user base would transfer onto the new technology.Services also aimed to pair people up using the most conservative measures of compatibility—matching like with like in the realm of social class, race, and religion, and focusing exclusively on a demographic constructed as, and assumed to be, heterosexual.Written and designed by men, these computer dating programs promised to take the messiness of human interaction out of the process of meeting women.At first glance, the approach seemed novel and potentially progressive, part and parcel of the context of growing sexual permissiveness in American cities during the 1960s and the “swinging sixties” in London.It shows that, contrary to what was previously believed, the first computerized dating system in either the US or the UK was run by a woman.